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May 4, 2020

This portrait of my son and me is everything.

It was taken by photographer Karianne Munstedt, who came up with a brilliant idea to keep doing what she loves,spread some positivity and help the homeless during this pandemic.

Her project is called Portraits in the time of Coronavirus.

Karianne takes your virtual photos (yes, it can be done), you write a brief story about something positive that has happened during this time, and she features both in a portrait gallery on her Instagram page and her website.

The donation is $20 or more, which benefits Shoebox Ministry, to provide hygiene products to people experiencing homelessness and others in need.

In a new episode of Conversations with Catherine 

WATCH NOW 

I chat with Karianne about the inspiration behind the project and how you can get involved.

Every $1 donation provides 2.5 days of hygiene products.

So far she’s raised more than $1400!

I loved being part of this portrait project and including my son, because one of the most positive experiences for me during this time has been the gift of time with him.

Here is my story:

Time.

That’s what I will remember most about this time.

Time to spend with my son who this time next year will be graduating high school.

When will life slow down enough again that we jigsaw puzzle together at midnight during the week?

Time to sleep in and get my hubby to sleep in too!

Time to learn new skills and get organized.

Time to acknowledge the heroes on the front lines, risking their lives to save ours.

Time to create a YouTube series, Conversations with Catherine, to chat with people behind the positivity happening in our community right now and with experts about finding clarity in challenging times.

Yes, these are challenging times.

But time has a wonderful way of showing us what really matters.

To join this project visit Karianne on Instagram or her website KarianneMunstedt.com

#positivity #virtualportrait #myson #time #blessings #covid19

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