THE IMPACT OF THE BOOK ‘UNTAMED’

Share This Post

Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter
Share on email

The Impact Of The Book ‘Untamed’
October 8, 2020

THIS BOOK IS LIFE!

It has been a long time since I’ve read a book that speaks to me as loudly and deeply as Untamed, by Glennon Doyle.

She is raw, honest and so darned inspiring.

That alone is worth reading her work.

Untamed is more than just a memoir. It’s is a visceral experience.

Untamed makes you want to stand up and do something – anything – to be absolute in living life on your terms.

I wish so much that I had this book when I was younger and fighting my own issues with body dysmorphia and exercise bulimia.

Or when I was married the first time, trying to create that picture I used to draw as a kid with the two-story house – complete with a white picket fence – and a mom, dad, two kids and a dog standing in front.

I wish I would’ve had this book when I was trying to raise my kids post-divorce and wanting so badly for them to be ‘undamaged’ from divorce that I didn’t give them any real room to experience what it’s like to fail.

I could relate to Glennon’s feelings in her first marriage of being in a relationship and still feeling alone.

Feeling satisfied but not happy.

Wanting to hold on for your children’s sake and realizing what you’re teaching your kids in the process is the complete opposite of how you want them to view love and marriage.

Then respecting each other enough as parents to come out of the bumpy road of divorce as friends and family.

I know that feeling of finding that person – your person – and finding yourself, in the process.

Glennon’s story is an example of how life changing it is to finally discover the freedom to be who we want and love who we are.

It’s a powerful reminder that we are capable of the very things we spend years thinking we can’t do or don’t deserve.

Untamed is a powerful reminder to trust ourselves because, “we can do hard things.”

More To Explore

Tough Love

One of the biggest lessons I learned early-on in my career, is that the people who are the toughest on you, are often the people