SORORITY SUCCESS

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Sorority Success
August 6, 2020

#tbt 1987
With my mom and my nana in front of the Alpha Phi house at USC.
This was the first time my nana had ever set foot at a sorority house.
Our family didn’t have any connection to Greek life.
But in the spring of 1985, my mom decided to drive me down fraternity/sorority row, just months before I would start my freshman year at USC.
I was so intrigued by the big houses and the number of students out front who seemed to be having the best time.
I didn’t know anything about Greek life when I decided to go through sorority rush that fall.
But the minute I set foot in the Alpha Phi  house, I felt like I belonged.
I was ecstatic to receive my invitation to pledge Alpha Phi and become a member of a sisterhood that would help shape who I am today.
I went in a shy 17-year old, who was still discovering herself and her confidence.
By the time I graduated, I had become a self-assured young woman, who had held several leadership roles, discovered her voice and developed close friendships.
Years later, I expressed my gratitude to my mom for the sacrifices she made for me to afford to be in a sorority, by helping her become an honorary Alpha Phi initiate (she even has her own pin) and several more years later, I watched with pride as my daughter become an Alpha Phi at USC.
My love for Alpha Phi and my sorority experience clearly runs deep.
So I am beyond thrilled to be honored this weekend as a Phoenix Panhellenic Association Woman of Impact.
Because of COVID, the Centennial Celebration will take place virtually.
Since we won’t be together in person, I want to thank the women of Phoenix Panhellenic Association for this recognition – and for spoiling me all week with handwritten notes and other fun goodies.
To this day, my sorority experience is still one of the most important and meaningful decisions I’ve ever made and I accept this honor with love and gratitude.

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